What's New: Version 0.5 was released on February 9th, 2005.

Welcome to JVR. Our goal is to provide a Java compatability library for the Dialogic System Release Software. JVR provides Java applications with the same (or similiar) access to the Dialogic API that C/C++ applications have. As much as possible the same interfaces and behaviours are maintained. Perhaps a code example would be more informative.

In C, an application would use the Dialogic Voice library to control a voice resource:

int handle;
if ((handle = dx_open("dxxxB1C1",0)) == -1) {
  /* handle error */
}
if (dx_playvox(handle,"filename.vox",null,null,EV_SYNC) == -1) {
  /* handle error */
}
dx_close(handle);
Using JVR a Java application can perform the same tasks:
int handle;
try {
  handle = dx.open("dxxxB1C1",0);
  dx.playvox(handle,"filename.vox",null,null,dx.EV_SYNC);
}
catch (JVRException e) {
  /* handle error */ 
}
finally {
  try { dx.close(handle); } catch (JVRException e) { /* handle error */ }
}

See the online documentation for complete details on JVR.

Who Uses JVR. JVR is downloaded about 60 times per month but we've only heard back from a fraction of those users. JVR is being used as the foundation for a distributed voice mail system, an outbound political-campaign autodialer, an outbound telemarketing predictive dialer (with agent station and conferencing) and a customer-service interactive voice response (IVR) system.

Commercial Support. Kevin O'Donnell, principal of Jerboa Software and Services, provides commercial support for JVR and regular non-Java Dialogic software solutions. If you are looking for help to get your application off the ground or have an existing solution that requires maintenance visit Jerboa Software and Solutions for more information.

License. JVR is released under the Lesser General Public License (LGPL). Versions of JVR prior to 0.5 were released under the General Public License (GPL). JVR is free for commercial and personal use (see the relevant licenses for details).